May Your Wines
Fall Bright

This is our free "E-Book" to help our amateur winemakers!

TABLE OF 
CONTENTS

Title Page
Home on Keuka Lake

CATALOG

Index-Sitemap

Welcome Location
About the Authors

Basic Winemaking
Getting Started

AddingSugarChart

Adding
Sugar Math
Airlocks
Juice to Wine
Grapes to Wine
BATF

Bottle Fillers -Wands

Bottling

Bungs

Cleaning

Containers

Corks

Corkers

Fining and Clearing

Hydrometer Test

Hydrometer +5 to 5

Malolactic Culture

pH

Siphon

Spigot

Yeast: 
Lalvin

Red Star

Starter

Recommendations

Steve Shanker's Winemaking Site

ACID REDUCTION 
and ADDITION

Acid Testing TA
Acidex

Calcium Carbonate

Cold Stabilizing

Potassium Bicarbonate
Potassium Sorbate
Sodium Hydroxide
Tartaric Acid 

Water and Blending

CONVERSIONS
Metric Equil
.

FILTRATION
Buon Vino Mini Jet

Instructions-Mini

Cleaning-Mini
Bypass pumping

Buon Vino SuperJet

Instructions-Super

Mark III

Vinamat-type 

OAK
Barrel Treatment

Oak Chips
and Oak Mor

PROBLEMS
Fining
Hydrogen Sulfide:
Copper Sulfate
Bocksin
Reduless

Stuck Fermentation    
Vinegar

SPECIALTY WINES
Blending

Bottling Sweet
 
Fruit Wines
Late Harvest Vignoles
and Riesling

Sherry
Sparkling Wine

TEST
Acid Testing

Clinitest

Clinitest-Poison

NaOH Chart
Testing  NaOH

Residual Sugar

S02 Sulfite Test
Titrets

Vinometer Alcohol

Vines, Nurseries, 
Vineyard Supplies
 
Partial list for sure!

BREWING
Basic Brewing

Beginner Mashing

HOP TOXICITY
Hop Toxicity Medical

Index-Sitemap

Online shopping at  

www.fallbright.com 

May Your Wines 
Fall Bright!

 

Sugar addition by Calculation
Fall Bright, The Winemakers Shoppe  www.fallbright.com

First:  Take a hydrometer reading of the fresh juice.  Then use the technique below to determine the amount of sugar to add to raise the brix to the desired level.  

The rates given in the chart on the previous page are subject to rounding off to the nearest tenth.  The rates are for pounds to add to 1 gallon.

Fact:   .125 pounds of sugar will raise 1 gallon 1 brix or degree.   
One ounce is .0625 pounds.  
One pound of corn (dextrose) sugar is 3 cups
and
approximately 1 pound of table (sucrose) sugar is 2 cups.   
Honey
:   5 pounds of honey is equivalent to 4 pounds of cane sugar.    

General conversion of sugar to alcohol is approximately 58% (0.575%~).

To calculate sugar adjustment to 21 brix using straight math:

We use corn sugar (dextrose), as it is a simple sugar ready for yeast consumption and its powdered form dissolves easily.  Take the initial Brix reading of the juice with a hydrometer.  Compute the increase in brix desired (i.e. 15 to 21=60).  Estimate your gallonage after fermentation based on 12-13 pounds of fruit per gallon.  Approximate yield from 65 pounds of grapes (fermented on the skins) will be ~5 gallons.  Multiply the increase of brix desired (6) by the number of gallons to be adjusted (5x6 gal=30).  As .125 pounds of sugar raises 1 gallon 10 brix, multiply this (30) by .125.  That number will equal the pounds of sugar to add to the entire batch of must  (or crushed grapes) or juice.  The amount of sugar to add for this batch (30 X .125) is 3.75 pounds.  Three (3) cups of corn sugar is approximately 1 pound and 2 1/4 cups of cane sugar is about 1 pound.  Add the required sugar.  If you use cane sugar it is recommended to heat it in some of the juice.  The heat and acid will convert it to a simple sugar.